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Milford Medicaid Planning: Unraveling the Mystery of the 5-Year Look-Back Rule

  • By Franklin Drazen
  • |
  • Posted June 13, 2024

As you delve into Medicaid and long-term care planning, you've probably encountered the dreaded "5-year look-back rule." This rule often leads to confusion and misconceptions, with many believing they must deplete their assets to a mere $2,000 within five years of needing care.

But the reality is far more nuanced.

Understanding Medicaid: It's State-Specific

The first crucial point is that Medicaid is a state-administered program, meaning its rules and regulations vary depending on where you live. What applies to someone in another state may not be relevant to your situation in Connecticut.

Exemptions: Not Everything Counts

The 5-year look-back rule does exist in most states, but it doesn't mean you have to give away everything you own. Many assets are exempt from the look-back period, meaning you can keep them without affecting your Medicaid eligibility.

These exemptions often include:

  • Your Home: In many states, your primary residence is exempt up to a specific value.
  • Your Car: One vehicle is typically exempt.
  • Personal Belongings: Furniture, clothing, and other personal items are usually not counted.
  • Prepaid Funeral Expenses: Funds for funeral and burial costs are often exempt.

In some states, like California, the 5-year look-back rule has been eliminated for certain types of Medicaid long-term care.

Penalty Periods: It's Not All or Nothing

Even if you make a transfer under the look-back rule, it doesn't necessarily mean you're permanently disqualified from Medicaid. Instead, you may face a "penalty period" where you're ineligible for a specific time, depending on the value of the transferred assets.

The Power of Personalized Planning

While online resources and general information can be a good starting point, understanding Connecticut's specific rules and exemptions requires professional guidance. An experienced elder law attorney can help you with the following:

  • Determine which assets are exempt in your situation.
  • Calculate any potential penalty periods.
  • Develop a personalized plan to protect your assets and qualify for Medicaid when needed.
  • Navigate the complex Medicaid application process.

Don't let fear and uncertainty keep you from getting the care you deserve. Contact our law firm today at 203-877-7511 for a consultation. We can help you understand your options, create a plan that meets your unique needs, and ensure you have peace of mind about your future.


Contact our elder law and estate planning lawyers in Milford and New Haven, Connecticut.



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